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Earning your Medical Assisting Degree and balancing your time

Posted on September 26th, 2016 by Florida Technical College

Have you been putting your future on hold? Florida Technical College offers medical assistant classes that could have you earning a Medical Assisting Degree during your spare time. Getting a degree in Medical Assisting has never been more possible. With the demands of a busy work schedule and home life, many are choosing to return to Technical Institutes to advance their skill set and career path. With an open enrollment policy, earning an Associate Degree in Medical Assisting from FTC allows you to manage your time and start your future now. Here’s why earning an Associate in Medical Assisting is the right choice for your busy schedule.   Flexible Classes Technical schools preparing for a medical assisting degree offer their students a variety of class times, including day and night classes, as well as online programs. These flexible class times allow students to maintain a job while completing the requirements for their medical assisting degree. Community and Technical Colleges are the leading providers for online learning, allowing students to remain focused in their professional lives, not having to take time off for classes. While online classes are always an option that makes time management easier while in school, students should assess their individual skills before deciding which route will benefit them most. Some of these assessments include considering your knowledge of computer programs and technology, your level of reading comprehension, and the time you are able to devote to each online course. Not only can class instruction time be scheduled to suit your own individual needs, the required laboratory portions for medical assistant classes, and medical assistant externships are often offered during night hours, as well as during the day. While earning a medical assisting degree, students are required to complete 160 hours in an externship. Students earn class credits towards their degree with the completion of their externship, which offers an expansive array of medical offices, or companies to choose from, and can lead to employment directly after graduation. This opportunity gives individuals the chance to build a relationship with medical professionals giving them favorability when it comes time to pursue entry-level positions. Many medical practices must operate during all hours, and facilities and services such as residential care and assisted living, hospital administration, and Urgent Care make completing the requirements for a medical assisting degree easier than ever. Flexibility is just one of the many advantages of medical assistant programs, allowing you to balance your time and needs. Hands-On Training Many medical providers are willing to hire students in training, offering them positions before completing their degree. Many of these opportunities offer round the clock care, making early morning, or late night shifts available. The training a medical assistant student will receive works double duty as each student receives an education and hands on work experience all at once. In today’s society time is money, and why not spend your time on the fast track to a successful career? Instead of waiting for graduation to decide on the environment in which you would like to work, why not start while you are still in school? The externship offers a chance to get started on your professional goals, allowing students to choose a field to focus on and complete the externship at a practice or facility that specializes in this field. Finding your niche, or field of focus, saves time and allows each student to make strides toward obtaining a specific position, or a job at their desired practice within the medical field. While earning a medical assistant degree at a technical college like FTC, students are given the opportunity to choose from courses like microbiology, or medical theory to satisfy their elective requirements, and these allow students to study in their area of interest. If you have a desire to work in neurobiology you may want to fulfill an elective requirement with microbiology, however, if your desire is to work in primary care, medical theory may be the right elective for you. Managing your time while earning a degree in medical assisting is important, and your time can be best used when your focus is clear. If you are returning to school, holding a full-time job, or have the responsibilities and time constraints that come with being a parent, it is important to tailor your schooling to your own time restraints. These electives, along with the option to choose a field of focus for the required externship are just some of the ways medical assistant programs can make balancing your time between career, family, and education possible.   Shorter Duration When managing the dynamics of work, home life, and schooling, it is important to see the light at the end of the tunnel. With a shorter duration, medical assistant programs make it easier to plan your life. Medical assistant schools offer associate degrees in a short two year program that helps you stay focused on the finish line. With an end in sight, managing your time and planning your future becomes much easier. With the option of attending a technical college and enrolling in a medical assisting program you could be on the path to start working in your chosen career field before most jobs can offer raises and promotions. Not only will you be able to begin working a full-time job sooner, but the time you will save by choosing a medical assistant program or medical assisting school will save you money. When our independent lives begin every minute of our time has value. When your time comes at a price, a school that offers medical assisting classes gives you the best value for your time. In fact, a recent study conducted by the Economic Policy Institute shows that the unemployment and underemployment rates for graduates of a four year college have nearly doubled in comparison to those in 2007. With the high cost of attending a four-year institution, this statistic makes trade and technical school a smart investment of your time and money. Career Centered What better […]

Patient Care Technician vs. Medical Assisting

Posted on April 29th, 2016 by Florida Technical College

How Being a Patient Care Technician is Different from Medical Assisting  If you’re looking for a career in health care, and you want to get into that new position as soon as possible, a diploma from patient care technician schools like Florida Technical College may be just what you need. In reading about your health care career options you may be confused to see that there are programs and job descriptions for both patient care technicians and medical assistants. What’s the difference? Both of these are exciting careers you can get into with the hands-on training of a diploma program, but the day-to-day work and responsibilities are very different. Patient Care Technicians Work Directly with Patients The job duties of a medical assistant are diverse. They work with patients; they may do lab work; they also do office work and man the phones and patient records. Patient care technicians, on the other hand, only work side by side with nurses and doctors to directly care for patients. They may do some medical assisting work like inserting catheters or taking vital signs, but they are mostly responsible for just helping patients feel comfortable, making sure they can eat and helping them stay clean and take care of hygiene. Patient Care Technicians Do Not Do Administrative Work  The work of a patient care technician is always with the patients, unlike a medical assistant who may be expected to do filing, update patient records, and do other office duties. Patient care technician schools do not focus on these kinds of office skills because the work of a patient care tech is all about patients and their immediate needs, not the administrative needs of the office. Educational Requirements May Be Less for a Patient Care Technician While patient care technician schools like FTC offer diploma programs for both types of health care workers, many employees require more education and training for medical assistants. Regardless of which career path you choose, getting hands-on training is crucial to being able to do the job well and take care of patients. Every Day as a Patient Care Technician is Different As a patient care technician, your main responsibility is to care for your patients. This means that on any given day your duties depend on what they need. One day may involve helping a new patient get situated and adjusted to a long stay, while the next you may be helping to transport your patients to physical therapy and making sure their rooms are clean for their return. Both of these health careers are rewarding and interesting, but only patient care is totally focused on the needs of patients. If you want to be directly involved, every day, in making people feel better, this could be the career of your dreams. To get ready to find the right position, check out patient care technician schools like FTC. Contact us today to find out more about the diploma program that will give you the skills and credentials you need to land your first health care job.   RELATED ARTICLES: What it Means to Be a Patient Care Technician – Part 1 What it Means to Be a Patient Care Technician – Part 2

What’s the Difference Between Medical Billing & Medical Coding?

Posted on September 3rd, 2014 by Florida Technical College

The Difference Between Medical Billing & Medical Coding Medical Billing and Medical Coding are two separate skills but both are needed as one cannot function successfully without the other. They are the go-to person who communicates with the healthcare office where they are working to the health insurance companies. Medical Coding The medical coder is primarily responsible for abstracting and assigning the appropriate coding on claims. The coder must check various sources within the patient’s medical records: The transcription of doctor’s Laboratory test results Imagining studies   The code must then assign the following codes accordingly CPT Codes HCPCS Codes ICD-9 Codes ICD-10 Codes   A medical coder will be involved various tasks throughout their career. They may have to audit and re-file appeals of claims. They will communicate with the healthcare providers but hardly ever interact with the patients. They must be able to identify and apply up 144,000 different codes and communicate with the medical biller with the appropriate information necessary to process and file the claim with the insurance company. Medical Billing A medical biller is the person who processes, submits and follows up on claims with health insurance companies in order to receive payments for the services given by a healthcare provider. It is a tedious process that requires constant communication with the medical coder (if they are not the same person).You will need to understand medical insurance, the claims process, the appeals process and the impact on the practice’s revenue to successfully be able to optimize revenue performance. Medical Billing and Coding Together Medical billing and coding is often advertised as one skill purely because you cannot do one without the other. You cannot accurately bill someone without making sure all the codes are correctly addressed on insurance claims. That is why it is a synchronized skill. When you are considering the best schools to attend to learn medical billing and coding in Florida, from Pembroke Pines to Orlando, there is only one to consider, click here to find out.   RELATED ARTICLES A Medical Billing and Coding Diploma: the Path to Work-Life Balance? How to Prepare for a Great New Career as a Medical Billing and Coding Specialist Medical Coding and billing: 4 Common Myths